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Little Chute Windmill

and Van Asten Visitor Center
130 W Main St
Little Chute, WI 54140

Status

Open and operating.

 

Tours

Tours are available during open hours.  Admission is $6 for adults and $4 for children 7 and up.

 

Hours

April 1 - Memorial Day

   Tuesday: 9:00 A.M. to Noon

   Thursday: 1:00 to 4:00 P.M.

   Friday - Saturday: 11:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M.

 

Memorial Day - Labor Day

   Tuesday: 9:00 A.M. to Noon

   Thursday - Friday: 10:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M.

   Saturday: 11:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M.

   Sunday: Noon to 3:00 P.M.

 

Labor Day - Thanksgiving

   Tuesday: 9:00 A.M. to Noon

   Thursday: 1:00 to 4:00 P.M.

   Friday - Saturday: 11:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M.

 

Open by appointment in winter.

 

Wheelchair Accessible

Ground floor and stage / stone floor access via elevator.

 

Website

Little Chute Windmill

 

Tower Height

(unknown)

 

Sail Span

(unknown)

 

Uses

(2015 - present) Wheat

(2015 - present) Corn

 

Constructed

(2011 - 2015)

 

Millwright

Lucas Verbij

 

Owners

Little Chute, WI (2011 - present)

 

Sources

 

The Little Chute Windmill, still under construction in early 2014.

Photo by Tom Haskell

History of the Mill

 

The town of Little Chute, situated along the Fox River southwest of Green Bay, is known for its strong Dutch culture; but this small town is not well-known as a tourist area.  The construction of a new windmill and visitor center, however, will change that.  

 

Although talk of constructing an operating windmill took place several years earlier, it was only in 2006 that a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization was established to accumulate donations and gifts toward the mill’s construction, without using any taxpayer money.  

 

Before long, plans also included a visitor center that would provide a home for historical society and an elevator to access the stage of the mill.

 

In 2008, sufficient funds were raised to order the windmill through Verbij Hoogmade, BV.  Lucas Verbij is the fourth-generation millwright who also restored the Fabyan Windmill and the cap of the Murphy Windmill, among other projects.  

 

The new windmill is based upon an 1850s design, operating on a single run-of-stone with a sack hoist.  The cap can be luffed using a tail-pole and winch system, and the mill is also partially handicapped-accessible (in fact, it is one of only two mills in the country with elevators to the stage).

 

The windmill pieces were constructed over the next two years, but the project was put on hold until more funds were raised.  With great fanfare, the windmill broke ground on Tuesday, August 16, 2011.

 

Construction of the concrete and brick tower base began shortly thereafter as the wooden tower and internal mechanisms were assembled in Holland at Verbij's shop.

 

The mill and visitor center were completed in late 2014 and officially opened to the public on May 20, 2015.